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Byronic Hero: Manfred And Frankenstein

This 5 page paper defines Byronic hero and then looks at Manfred by Lord Byron and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Victorian Reading Habits: The Thrill of Transgression

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Thrill of Transgression: “Frankenstein” and “Manfred”

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Frankenstein or Monster: Which is the Hero?

A 5 page paper which examines the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, from Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," and discusses which is truly the hero. The paper argues that the monster is the hero. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

Quotations from Frankenstein

This 4 page paper uses direct quotes from "Frankenstein" to discuss the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, and the themes of the novel. It argues that Frankenstein is ultimately less human than his creation. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Shelley's Frankenstein/Dangers of Scientific Progress

A 6 page essay that examines Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The writer argues Shelley's novel seems to speak directly to the modern reader and offer explicit warning against scientific discovery unregulated by restrictions of morality or responsibility. Victor Frankenstein, Shelley's brilliant protagonist/scientist, suffers a tragic downfall worthy of the ancient Greek tragedians. Shelley's text suggests that this occurs due to two failings. First of all Frankenstein, like the ancient Greek tragic heroes, is guilty of hubris, that is, excessive pride, of "attempting to be like God" (Madigan 48), but also, he initially does not take responsibility for his actions. Furthermore, in his hubris, Frankenstein exhibits two characteristics that he himself castigates, "cowardice and carelessness," which he exhibits in the manner in which he deals with his creation (Shelley 37). Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Frankenstein

This 5 page paper focuses on the question of Frankenstein's regret for creating life. Some scholars have suggested Frankenstein regretted bringin his creature to life. This writer disagrees; Frankenstein held himself guiltless to the very end. There was not a moment of regret for the right reasons. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Feminist Overtones in Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein”: The Symbolism in the Role of “Victor”

A 5 page discussion of Mary Shelly’s classic science fiction. The author contends that the underlying theme of subjugation could be interpreted to apply to the societal situation which the feminist movement as a whole has revolted against. The primary perpetrator of this situation in Mary Shelly’s "Frankenstein" is identified as Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s fictional creator. No additional sources are listed.

CLERVAL, FRANKENSTEIN AND FRIENDSHIP

This paper discusses the significane of the friendship between Henry Clerval and Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. The essay examines what, symbolically and physically, the friendship represents to Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

How Mary Shelley's Life is Reflected in "Frankenstein"

A 5 page paper which examines how Mary Shelley's life is reflected in her classic Gothic novel, "Frankenstein," such as the death of her mother, the death of her son and the loneliness of her life as depicted in the characters of Victor Frankenstein, the monster, and the primary narrator, Robert Walton. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Frankenstein

A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Frankenstein/Defending the Monster

A 4 page essay that argues that Mary Shelley's portrayal of the Monster in her novel Frankenstein, indicts Dr. Victor Frankenstein rather than misbegotten creature that he brings into the world. In Shelley's novel, it is clear that the monster is an innocent, a "child" who has been deprived not only of his birth right, which is the love of his "parent," Dr. Frankenstein, but also of being able to have any place within human society and all because of his appearance, not because of his character. An examination of Shelley's text makes it clear that it is human society and, specifically Dr. Frankenstein, who is at fault and not the poor monster who did not ask to be created. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

THE PROCESS OF CREATION: VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN

This 4 page paper discusses the process of creation that Victor Frankenstein followed in Shelley's Frankenstein's Monster. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Satan & Frankenstein’s Monster

A 4 page essay that discusses the similarities between Satan in Milton’s “Paradise Lost” and the character of Frankenstein’s Monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Both characters were expelled from the place where they were created by their creators. Both were are considered hideous in form. Both are evil. However, there are also differences between the two characters that relate to the very different intentions of each author. No additional sources cited.

The Theme of Obsession in “Frankenstein”

This 5 page paper discusses the types of obsession portrayed in “Frankenstein,” including the obsession of Frankenstein for his experiments in creation; his subsequent obsession with fleeing from the creature; and the creature’s obsession with revenge. Bibliography lists 1 source.