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Mary Shelley’s Original “Frankenstein” and the Social Construction of Gender:

This 5 page report discusses Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s (1797-1851) “Frankenstein” and the ways in which serves as a metaphor for the social realities regarding gender in the early 19th century. The premise is that women are rejected in their efforts to be whole as surely as the monster was. In fact, the circumstances of the early 19th century would appear to people of the early 21st century to have been more disturbing than what was faced by Dr. Victor Frankenstein’s hapless creature. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

The Moral of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

This 5 page report discusses Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s novel “Frankenstein” and whether or not there is a moral to the story. The report asserts that there certainly is a moral but that the moral is multi-faceted and offers numerous areas for consideration of the moral in the story. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Mary Shelley’s Gothic Novel, 'Frankenstein'

A 10 page paper which examines the Gothicism of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s masterpiece, Frankenstein (1818), by first defining Gothic, then providing specific examples from the novel. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Mary Shelley

A 3 page paper which examines the life of Mary Shelley. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Frankenstein

A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / Human Source of the Monster

A 5 page paper examining the relationship between Mary Shelley's own feelings of parental abandonment and the way the Creature is abandoned by his creator. The paper goes over the main points of Shelley's life up to the writing of Frankenstein, and compares them to events in the book. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / Was She Playing God in the Creation of Frankenstein's Monster?

This 6 page paper provides an analysis of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, with a concentration on the argument that Mary Shelley was attempting to play God in the creation of the monster. This paper is an argumentative essay that supports this perspective utilizing passages from the text as well as elements in the history of Shelley's life. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein": The Theme of Nature

A 10 page discussion of Mary Shelley’s incorporation of nature in her novel. The author of this paper contends that Shelley employs nature to contrast the characteristics of Frankenstein and his creator Victor as well as to emphasize the error of mans ways in going against nature. Through various components of nature Shelley manages to instill deeper meaning, intrigue, and realism to a story which might otherwise be dismissed by some as only science fiction. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

MARY SHELLEY’S MONSTER

This 6 page paper gives a short synopsis of the book, then analyzes Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, for symbolism and theme. Emphasis is placed on the novel's themes and symbols paralleling Shelley's own life. Also included are excerpts from David Colling's essay about Shelley and the feminine maternal parallels. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Shelley's "Frankenstein"

A five page paper looking at Mary Shelley's novel in terms of its larger social significance. The paper concludes that Shelley hints at topics as far-ranging as the ethics of men playing God, to the importance of a father's role in the rearing of children, to the tragedy of imperialism -- all within the relatively simple story of a scientist who wished to replicate human life. Bibliography lists three sources.

Shelley's Monster/Milton's Satan

An 8 page research paper that discusses how a comparison between John Milton's Paradise Lost and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein can reveal multiple layers of meaning in the latter work. The writer argues that Shelley's allusions to Milton, as well as direct quotes, demonstrate that her brooding tale was influenced by Milton's work. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Frankenstein: A Story Still Valid Today

A 10 page paper which discusses how Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is still a valid story today. The paper discusses the subject of parenting and abandonment, and of how people often do not take responsibility for their own actions. These are issues that clearly involve mankind, no matter the time period, and as such are valid conditions that make Shelley's Frankenstein a work still relevant today. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

Shelley's 'Frankenstein' vs. Wharton's 'The Age of Innocence'

A 7 page paper in which the writer argues that while both women were expressing changing attitudes in femininity thought in their books through contrast and duality, Edith Wharton's view was made through an expansive flowing growth and Mary Shelley's was from an explosive view. The purpose of both stories was to show the need for men and women to come together in equal treatment of women during different eras. Whereas Wharton looked at the changes from the idea of growing together, Shelley's view was of killing off the old ideas. No additional sources cited.

The Psychological Aspects of Victor Frankenstein

5 pages. Discusses the psychology of the man behind the monster. Ever since the birth of Shelley’s book in Geneva in 1816 the world has been drawn to this tale of the creating of life in a scientific laboratory. Based on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Themes Concerning Parenting and Responsibility in "Frankenstein"

An 8 page paper which discusses various themes within Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" which speak of paternal and maternal abandonment. The paper also discusses other forms of abandonment and lack of responsibility as they involve Shelley's story. Bibliography lists 4 sources.