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Frankenstein: Feminine and Human Nature

A 6 page paper which discusses various aspects of Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' as they involve feminine nature. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

The Exorcist and Frankenstein

A 4 page examination of William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as they present the nature of evil and human nature. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Quotations from Frankenstein

This 4 page paper uses direct quotes from "Frankenstein" to discuss the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, and the themes of the novel. It argues that Frankenstein is ultimately less human than his creation. Bibliography lists 1 source.

MARY SHELLEY’S MONSTER

This 6 page paper gives a short synopsis of the book, then analyzes Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, for symbolism and theme. Emphasis is placed on the novel's themes and symbols paralleling Shelley's own life. Also included are excerpts from David Colling's essay about Shelley and the feminine maternal parallels. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Frankenstein: The Female Monster

An 8 page paper which examines Mary Shelley's treatment of feminine issues as it relates to the female monster, as well as to Frankenstein's mother, and the monster. Issues of abandonment are the focus of the paper. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein": The Theme of Nature

A 10 page discussion of Mary Shelley’s incorporation of nature in her novel. The author of this paper contends that Shelley employs nature to contrast the characteristics of Frankenstein and his creator Victor as well as to emphasize the error of mans ways in going against nature. Through various components of nature Shelley manages to instill deeper meaning, intrigue, and realism to a story which might otherwise be dismissed by some as only science fiction. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Frankenstein/Defending the Monster

A 4 page essay that argues that Mary Shelley's portrayal of the Monster in her novel Frankenstein, indicts Dr. Victor Frankenstein rather than misbegotten creature that he brings into the world. In Shelley's novel, it is clear that the monster is an innocent, a "child" who has been deprived not only of his birth right, which is the love of his "parent," Dr. Frankenstein, but also of being able to have any place within human society and all because of his appearance, not because of his character. An examination of Shelley's text makes it clear that it is human society and, specifically Dr. Frankenstein, who is at fault and not the poor monster who did not ask to be created. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

CLERVAL, FRANKENSTEIN AND FRIENDSHIP

This paper discusses the significane of the friendship between Henry Clerval and Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. The essay examines what, symbolically and physically, the friendship represents to Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Feminist Overtones in Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein”: The Symbolism in the Role of “Victor”

A 5 page discussion of Mary Shelly’s classic science fiction. The author contends that the underlying theme of subjugation could be interpreted to apply to the societal situation which the feminist movement as a whole has revolted against. The primary perpetrator of this situation in Mary Shelly’s "Frankenstein" is identified as Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s fictional creator. No additional sources are listed.

Victorian Reading Habits: The Thrill of Transgression

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Thrill of Transgression: “Frankenstein” and “Manfred”

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Frankenstein

This 5 page paper focuses on the question of Frankenstein's regret for creating life. Some scholars have suggested Frankenstein regretted bringin his creature to life. This writer disagrees; Frankenstein held himself guiltless to the very end. There was not a moment of regret for the right reasons. Bibliography lists 1 source.

The Modern Prometheus

Humans have within their grasp the ability and technology to create life. Many believe that this knowledge will lead to further degradation of the human spirit. But others, like Prometheus and his gift of fire, believe that new technology is the key to a new, and better, reality. Genetic engineering and, specifically, cloning, of human life has become an issue of extreme gravity in the age of technology where anything may be dreamed and many things are possible. Like Frankenstein and his creation, is Man playing God? and what are the unforeseen consequences? This 5 page paper examines the moral questions that must be faced as the current society deals with the reality of cloning and compares this situation with Mary Shelley's story of Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Frankenstein

A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / The Monster's Story

This 6 page paper provides an overview of the themes and impact of the Monster's story in the larger novel Frankenstein. In the center of Mary Shelley's novel, the Monster provides an insightful narrative that tells of his experiences after being created by Victor Frankenstein, a narrative that relates his process of learning about his surroundings, language and human emotion. This narrative provides a significant view of the psychology of human development, underscores the problems of creating life using technology, and substantiates the view of the internal conflicts and misperceptions of the Monster pertinent to the defense of his actions. No additional sources cited.