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Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / The Doctor vs. The Victim

A 5 page comparison of Victor Frankenstein himself with the Creature he made. The paper characterizes Dr. Victor Frankenstein as a portrait of all those scientific over-achievers who give no heed to the ethics of their experimentations, and Victor's Creature as the representation all those victims who have to live with the effects. Bibliography lists three sources.

Frankenstein/Defending the Monster

A 4 page essay that argues that Mary Shelley's portrayal of the Monster in her novel Frankenstein, indicts Dr. Victor Frankenstein rather than misbegotten creature that he brings into the world. In Shelley's novel, it is clear that the monster is an innocent, a "child" who has been deprived not only of his birth right, which is the love of his "parent," Dr. Frankenstein, but also of being able to have any place within human society and all because of his appearance, not because of his character. An examination of Shelley's text makes it clear that it is human society and, specifically Dr. Frankenstein, who is at fault and not the poor monster who did not ask to be created. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Feminist Overtones in Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein”: The Symbolism in the Role of “Victor”

A 5 page discussion of Mary Shelly’s classic science fiction. The author contends that the underlying theme of subjugation could be interpreted to apply to the societal situation which the feminist movement as a whole has revolted against. The primary perpetrator of this situation in Mary Shelly’s "Frankenstein" is identified as Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s fictional creator. No additional sources are listed.

Quotations from Frankenstein

This 4 page paper uses direct quotes from "Frankenstein" to discuss the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, and the themes of the novel. It argues that Frankenstein is ultimately less human than his creation. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Victorian Reading Habits: The Thrill of Transgression

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Thrill of Transgression: “Frankenstein” and “Manfred”

This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Frankenstein

This 5 page paper focuses on the question of Frankenstein's regret for creating life. Some scholars have suggested Frankenstein regretted bringin his creature to life. This writer disagrees; Frankenstein held himself guiltless to the very end. There was not a moment of regret for the right reasons. Bibliography lists 1 source.

CLERVAL, FRANKENSTEIN AND FRIENDSHIP

This paper discusses the significane of the friendship between Henry Clerval and Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. The essay examines what, symbolically and physically, the friendship represents to Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Frankenstein

A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Shelley's Frankenstein/Dangers of Scientific Progress

A 6 page essay that examines Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The writer argues Shelley's novel seems to speak directly to the modern reader and offer explicit warning against scientific discovery unregulated by restrictions of morality or responsibility. Victor Frankenstein, Shelley's brilliant protagonist/scientist, suffers a tragic downfall worthy of the ancient Greek tragedians. Shelley's text suggests that this occurs due to two failings. First of all Frankenstein, like the ancient Greek tragic heroes, is guilty of hubris, that is, excessive pride, of "attempting to be like God" (Madigan 48), but also, he initially does not take responsibility for his actions. Furthermore, in his hubris, Frankenstein exhibits two characteristics that he himself castigates, "cowardice and carelessness," which he exhibits in the manner in which he deals with his creation (Shelley 37). Bibliography lists 4 sources.

The Modern Prometheus

Humans have within their grasp the ability and technology to create life. Many believe that this knowledge will lead to further degradation of the human spirit. But others, like Prometheus and his gift of fire, believe that new technology is the key to a new, and better, reality. Genetic engineering and, specifically, cloning, of human life has become an issue of extreme gravity in the age of technology where anything may be dreamed and many things are possible. Like Frankenstein and his creation, is Man playing God? and what are the unforeseen consequences? This 5 page paper examines the moral questions that must be faced as the current society deals with the reality of cloning and compares this situation with Mary Shelley's story of Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

A 7 page paper which discusses various aspects of Shelley's "Frankenstein" as they concern Frankenstein, his admission to responsibility and his responsibility to his creation. No additional sources cited.

Frankenstein or Monster: Which is the Hero?

A 5 page paper which examines the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, from Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," and discusses which is truly the hero. The paper argues that the monster is the hero. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

Mary Shelley’s Original “Frankenstein” and the Social Construction of Gender:

This 5 page report discusses Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s (1797-1851) “Frankenstein” and the ways in which serves as a metaphor for the social realities regarding gender in the early 19th century. The premise is that women are rejected in their efforts to be whole as surely as the monster was. In fact, the circumstances of the early 19th century would appear to people of the early 21st century to have been more disturbing than what was faced by Dr. Victor Frankenstein’s hapless creature. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

(5 pp)The complex system of framing devices used in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, where in some parts, the Creature is telling the story to Victor Frankenstein, who, then tells the story to-Captain Robert Walton, who chooses to -recount the story in letters to-Margaret Saville. This story-telling device, not only let's us know what is going on, but it also informs us of the attitudes of those telling the tale, and who does, or does not know about someone else. This complex confidentiality will be examined in this discussion.