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Empathy and Human Rights in Shelley, Conrad, and Borowski

An eight page paper looking at these issues as presented in Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein,' Joseph Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness,' and Tadeusz Borowski's 'This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen.' Tracing these themes from the Enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century, the paper argues that in order to secure human rights for all, we need to be able to empathize with one another's pain. Bibliography lists five sources.

Frankenstein/Defending the Monster

A 4 page essay that argues that Mary Shelley's portrayal of the Monster in her novel Frankenstein, indicts Dr. Victor Frankenstein rather than misbegotten creature that he brings into the world. In Shelley's novel, it is clear that the monster is an innocent, a "child" who has been deprived not only of his birth right, which is the love of his "parent," Dr. Frankenstein, but also of being able to have any place within human society and all because of his appearance, not because of his character. An examination of Shelley's text makes it clear that it is human society and, specifically Dr. Frankenstein, who is at fault and not the poor monster who did not ask to be created. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Shelley's "Frankenstein"

A five page paper looking at Mary Shelley's novel in terms of its larger social significance. The paper concludes that Shelley hints at topics as far-ranging as the ethics of men playing God, to the importance of a father's role in the rearing of children, to the tragedy of imperialism -- all within the relatively simple story of a scientist who wished to replicate human life. Bibliography lists three sources.

Human Personality According to Freud and Personified by Conrad’s “Kurtz” and Shelley’s “Dr. Frankenstein”

This 5 page report discusses two primary characters who are well-known in terms of literary, social, and historical commentary and considers their development as would be applied in Sigmund Freud’s understanding of human personality. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

MARY SHELLEY’S MONSTER

This 6 page paper gives a short synopsis of the book, then analyzes Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, for symbolism and theme. Emphasis is placed on the novel's themes and symbols paralleling Shelley's own life. Also included are excerpts from David Colling's essay about Shelley and the feminine maternal parallels. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein": The Theme of Nature

A 10 page discussion of Mary Shelley’s incorporation of nature in her novel. The author of this paper contends that Shelley employs nature to contrast the characteristics of Frankenstein and his creator Victor as well as to emphasize the error of mans ways in going against nature. Through various components of nature Shelley manages to instill deeper meaning, intrigue, and realism to a story which might otherwise be dismissed by some as only science fiction. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / Was She Playing God in the Creation of Frankenstein's Monster?

This 6 page paper provides an analysis of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, with a concentration on the argument that Mary Shelley was attempting to play God in the creation of the monster. This paper is an argumentative essay that supports this perspective utilizing passages from the text as well as elements in the history of Shelley's life. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Shelley's Frankenstein/Dangers of Scientific Progress

A 6 page essay that examines Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The writer argues Shelley's novel seems to speak directly to the modern reader and offer explicit warning against scientific discovery unregulated by restrictions of morality or responsibility. Victor Frankenstein, Shelley's brilliant protagonist/scientist, suffers a tragic downfall worthy of the ancient Greek tragedians. Shelley's text suggests that this occurs due to two failings. First of all Frankenstein, like the ancient Greek tragic heroes, is guilty of hubris, that is, excessive pride, of "attempting to be like God" (Madigan 48), but also, he initially does not take responsibility for his actions. Furthermore, in his hubris, Frankenstein exhibits two characteristics that he himself castigates, "cowardice and carelessness," which he exhibits in the manner in which he deals with his creation (Shelley 37). Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mary Shelley

A 3 page paper which examines the life of Mary Shelley. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Frankenstein

A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Exorcist and Frankenstein

A 4 page examination of William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as they present the nature of evil and human nature. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' / Feminism & Science

A 7 page paper discussing the significance of Dr. Frankenstein's creation of a human being without the aid of a woman. The paper concludes that Mary Shelley's tale was a reaction against what she saw as a paternalistic attempt on the part of male scientists to usurp creative power for themselves. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

The Myth of Frankenstein

More focused upon scientific issue than upon the classic sci-fi novel, this 4 page research paper refutes Mary Shelley's premise that scientists will some day create life through brain transplants and other methodologies touched upon in her story. Parallels are made between genetics and the 'Power of God' as well as issues concerning the existence of the human soul. Bibliography lists 3 sources which support the writer's thesis that there is more to 'life' than the brain.

VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN: FLAWED HERO

This essay tries to answer the question of whether Victor Frankenstein, in the Mary Shelley classic novel, acted heroically or was a flawed human being; a question that literary critics and analysists have attempted to answer for decades. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Themes Concerning Parenting and Responsibility in "Frankenstein"

An 8 page paper which discusses various themes within Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" which speak of paternal and maternal abandonment. The paper also discusses other forms of abandonment and lack of responsibility as they involve Shelley's story. Bibliography lists 4 sources.